Goodwill Fashion Show at Artisphere


By Steve Hibbard, Connection



Arlington – Arlington’s Artisphere featured the Fashion of Goodwill Runway Show and Gala on Tuesday, Sept. 24, which raised about $155,000 for the cause. With the theme “The Art of Fashion,” Vietnamese designer Tu-Anh Nguyen of Fairfax created the show from hand-selected items found at Goodwill of Greater Washington’s 15 retail stores.











Models at The Fashion of Goodwill Runway Show and Gala at The Artisphere. Photo by Steve Hibbard.


The show featured 20 models sporting 150 vintage and contemporary outfits in an understated white room with silver chairs and accents to put the focus on the models. Tu-Anh was inspired by TV’s “Mad Men” (Megan and Betty Draper), and scanned local Goodwill stores for four months to find 1960s-infused items. She organized clothing by color — full scenes in Pink: Romance, Metallic Neutrals, and Gotta Love Black and White. “So keeping things simple and focusing on the models is much better,” she said.



“Everything that was featured in the show was donated to Goodwill,” said Brendan Hurley, chief marketing officer. “Everything was pulled from the racks of our retail stores.” Proceeds go to Goodwill’s free job-training for careers in hospitality and unarmed security services, as well as supporting people with disabilities and disadvantages.



Saxophonist Johnny Long meandered on the runway while DJ Heather Femia selected psychedelic Austin Powers and James Bond-inspired tunes.



Tu-Anh used terms like “raw, unfinished and accidental” to describe pieces she selected off the rack. “As I was pulling, the amazing pieces that I found, it all just tied in,” said Tu-Anh, who graduated from Oakton High School and FIT in New York in the 1990s.



“If it’s not sexy, stylish and timeless, then I’m not going to pull it,” she said. “Less is more — that’s my branding … If you overdo it, it looks outdated,” she added. The clothing was not modified in any way — just steamed and ironed.



Fashion assistant Morgan Swersey, 22, of Woodbridge just grabbed a rolling rack and cart at Goodwill stores. “I would pull things that I thought would fit the theme,” she said. “I had the general theme, but Tu-Anh had her vision.” The Madison High grad who worked since May described the process like a puzzle — combining different clothing together.

Read the full article by Steve Hibbard of the Connection.


Báo Người Việt hoan nghênh quý vị độc giả đóng góp và trao đổi ý kiến. Chúng tôi xin quý vị theo một số quy tắc sau đây:

Tôn trọng sự thật.
Tôn trọng các quan điểm bất đồng.
Dùng ngôn ngữ lễ độ, tương kính.
Không cổ võ độc tài phản dân chủ.
Không cổ động bạo lực và óc kỳ thị.
Không vi phạm đời tư, không mạ lỵ cá nhân cũng như tập thể.

Tòa soạn sẽ từ chối đăng tải các ý kiến không theo những quy tắc trên.

Xin quý vị dùng chữ Việt có đánh dấu đầy đủ. Những thư viết không dấu có thể bị từ chối vì dễ gây hiểu lầm cho người đọc. Tòa soạn có thể hiệu đính lời văn nhưng không thay đổi ý kiến của độc giả, và sẽ không đăng các bức thư chỉ lập lại ý kiến đã nhiều người viết. Việc đăng tải các bức thư không có nghĩa báo Người Việt đồng ý với tác giả.

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