Back to school, older and wiser


 


 


Winter break is over, and though I would love to continue getting 11 hours of sleep a day, it’s about time I get back into the swing of things.


           


It’s the new semester.


           


Even with just one semester of college life behind me, everything felt so nostalgic to me the week before my classes started — the purchasing of textbooks, the worrying over good and bad professors — all of that stuff. Everything pretty much came and went and didn’t prove to be as bad as last semester, but there was one thing that I was highly anticipating: my birthday, which fell on the first day of my new classes.


           


I am now, officially, a 16-year-old, second-semester college student.


           


I was hoping to report I had taken and passed my driver’s license test, but alas, my schedule this semester is now preventing me from doing so until who knows how long. Secretly, I still don’t really mind; I like having my chauffeurs (my mom and dad) drop me off and pick me up. What was a bit nerve-wracking, though, was the trouble of getting into my wait-listed classes. Even though I already had received prior permission to be allowed into four classes, I had trouble when it came time to register. Thankfully, my birthday present came right on time as I eventually got into all of my classes without any problems.


           


The only thing about this is that I’ve got two night classes, so that means I’m staying on campus until approximately 10 p.m. two days of the week. I suppose it isn’t bad, since I love the classes, but I hope it won’t affect the amount of sleep I get every night; I still need to sleep to grow taller, you know! Although I spent my birthday at school with a couple of bumps in the road, it was great being able to see my old friends from last semester and meet new people I’ll be in class with for this coming semester.


           


One big highlight of the first week was that I got to work on an actual cadaver in my Anatomy lab. Being young and all, it’s a different kind of experience for me. I’m not going to lie; I wasn’t nervous at all. OK, maybe a little — or a lot, more or less. It’s going to take some getting used to for me and cadavers, but donors didn’t give their body to labs for students to be scared. I’ll get used to it eventually. I hope.


           


Also, I’d like to thank Chapman’s Honors community. I was surprised in the commons with cake, cream puffs and Fruity Pebbles — my most beloved cereal in the world. I’m so glad to be a part of the program, and thanks to Dr. Carmichael Peters for thinking of putting this together for me. As the youngest Honors Program student at Chapman, I won’t let you all down.


           


Now that the first week is done, there’s no going back. I truly hope this semester will be a good one. It’s only the first month of school, but I’m already dreading finals week. Is this bad? Oh well, only one way to find out.


           


I guess it’s goodbye to being known as the “15-year-old-boy-in-college.” But hey, “16-and-in-college” sounds good too, I guess.


           


Former child actor Andrew Vo is sharing his experiences as a now 16-year-old student at Chapman University in Orange, Calif. Follow him on Twitter @VoAndrew.


Báo Người Việt hoan nghênh quý vị độc giả đóng góp và trao đổi ý kiến. Chúng tôi xin quý vị theo một số quy tắc sau đây:

Tôn trọng sự thật.
Tôn trọng các quan điểm bất đồng.
Dùng ngôn ngữ lễ độ, tương kính.
Không cổ võ độc tài phản dân chủ.
Không cổ động bạo lực và óc kỳ thị.
Không vi phạm đời tư, không mạ lỵ cá nhân cũng như tập thể.

Tòa soạn sẽ từ chối đăng tải các ý kiến không theo những quy tắc trên.

Xin quý vị dùng chữ Việt có đánh dấu đầy đủ. Những thư viết không dấu có thể bị từ chối vì dễ gây hiểu lầm cho người đọc. Tòa soạn có thể hiệu đính lời văn nhưng không thay đổi ý kiến của độc giả, và sẽ không đăng các bức thư chỉ lập lại ý kiến đã nhiều người viết. Việc đăng tải các bức thư không có nghĩa báo Người Việt đồng ý với tác giả.

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‘Giving back’ just one reason why Vietnamese-Americans volunteer

Vietnamese-Americans ranging in age from the late teens to the 60s gathered in Santa Ana recently to discuss how they’ll spend their time and energy on their next big project.

‘Crazy Rich Asians’ an important step in English-speaking countries

If you grew up in Asia and watched a lot of movies that have Asian stars, it isn’t a big deal to see “Crazy Rich Asians” on the big screen.

World Cup brings back the old world for elderly Vietnamese-Americans

Hundreds of soccer fans fill the newspaper’s community room and yell out any missed opportunities on near-goals.

Dispelling the stereotype: Vietnamese American high school students rely on self-resilience to achieve graduation

Titi Mary Tran/ Nguoi Viet English Alvin Nguyen, Donny Pham, Cathy Duong and Long Ho are four of thousands of high school seniors in California who are graduating this month. At first glance, this group of Vietnamese American high school...