VIFF coming to Little Saigon and name change to Viet Film Fest

From VAALA

Anaheim, CA – Organizers of the Vietnamese International Film Festival (ViFF), the nation’s premier film festival showcasing films by, for, and about the Vietnamese people and culture, announced today that they are changing their name to “Viet Film Fest,” making the event annual with screenings spanning four days instead of the previous biennial festival lasting for eight days. The screening location is also being moved closer to Little Saigon.

Viet Film Fest Poster

Changing the name and shifting it to an annual event comes ten years after the festival was founded in 2003.  “We made this decision because of the growth in Vietnamese cinema, which the festival has helped to expand by providing a high profile platform to showcase these films,” said Ysa Le, Co-Director for the new Viet Film Fest. “Changing our name has the dual purpose of highlighting our mission as well as avoiding confusion with other film festivals who share the acronym ‘VIFF.'”  She continues, “Screening the films over four consecutive days allows for filmmakers, producers, actors, and film industry people who fly in from around the country and the world more opportunities to network.”

The festival’s vision of celebrating the diversity of our communities by bringing together a multiplicity of perspectives and voices through the universal language of cinema remains unchanged.  Viet Film Fest is committed to expanding the horizons of Vietnamese cinema by providing a nurturing environment for artists to engage in meaningful dialogue with an international community.  It also serves as an important educational tool for learning about the historical and contemporary experiences of the Vietnamese in the United States and throughout the world.

Tram Le, Co-Director of Viet Film Fest, remarks, “Our goal in rebranding the festival is to support the filmmakers as well as to expand the audience for Vietnamese cinema.”  She adds, “Moving the festival closer to Little Saigon also maximizes the accessibility of the festival to the local Vietnamese community.”

Transitioning to the new name and design, including rebranding social media and other marketing material, will take place over the next six month as the organizers prepare for the seventh edition of the festival planned for April 10 – 13, 2014 at UltraLuxe Cinemas at Anaheim GardenWalk.

Viet Film Fest logo

About VAALA

Founded in 1991 by a group of Vietnamese American journalists, artists and friends, the Vietnamese American Arts & Letters Association (VAALA) is a community-based, 501 (c) (3) non-profit organization.  VAALA has organized numerous cultural events such as art exhibitions, book fairs, book signings, recitals, plays, lectures, year-long art and music classes, the annual Viet Film Fest, and annual Children’s Moon Festival Art Contest.


Báo Người Việt hoan nghênh quý vị độc giả đóng góp và trao đổi ý kiến. Chúng tôi xin quý vị theo một số quy tắc sau đây:

Tôn trọng sự thật.
Tôn trọng các quan điểm bất đồng.
Dùng ngôn ngữ lễ độ, tương kính.
Không cổ võ độc tài phản dân chủ.
Không cổ động bạo lực và óc kỳ thị.
Không vi phạm đời tư, không mạ lỵ cá nhân cũng như tập thể.

Tòa soạn sẽ từ chối đăng tải các ý kiến không theo những quy tắc trên.

Xin quý vị dùng chữ Việt có đánh dấu đầy đủ. Những thư viết không dấu có thể bị từ chối vì dễ gây hiểu lầm cho người đọc. Tòa soạn có thể hiệu đính lời văn nhưng không thay đổi ý kiến của độc giả, và sẽ không đăng các bức thư chỉ lập lại ý kiến đã nhiều người viết. Việc đăng tải các bức thư không có nghĩa báo Người Việt đồng ý với tác giả.

CES 2019 highlights: Flying car, Wall TV, roll-up TV screens, 5G, blockchain technology and AI

If Disneyland is the place where dreams come true for children, the Consumer Electronics Show is the space where adults make their dreams a reality.

Little Saigon: Asian-Americans protest Trump administration’s push to deport Vietnamese war refugees

Nearly 200 Asian-Americans gathered in Little Saigon on Saturday to protest the Trump administration’s efforts to deport protected Vietnamese immigrants, many of whom have lived in the United States since fleeing their home country during the Vietnam War.

One night in the ‘haunted house,’ the Buddha statue and the ‘hidden treasure

Ngọc Lan & Ðằng-Giao/Người Việt Translation: Titi Mary Tran Editor’s note: Nguoi Viet News reporters Ngoc Lan and Đằng Giao set out to answer the questions regarding the property, and the house, at the corner of Euclid Street and Hazard Avenue...

To tell the truth: Đằng was scared

Ngọc Lan & Ðằng-Giao/Người Việt Translation: Titi Mary Tran Editor’s note: Nguoi Viet News reporters Ngoc Lan and Đằng Giao set out to answer the questions regarding the property, and the house, at the corner of Euclid Street and Hazard Avenue...

Entering the ‘haunted house’ in Little Saigon for the first time

Ngọc Lan & Ðằng Giao/Người Việt Translation: Titi Mary Tran Editor’s note: Nguoi Viet News reporters Ngoc Lan and Đằng Giao set out to answer the questions regarding the property, and the house, at the corner of Euclid Street and Hazard...

Adventure to the most ‘haunted house’ in Little Saigon

Ngọc Lan & Đằng-Giao/Người Việt Translation: Titi Mary Tran Editor’s note: Nguoi Viet News reporters Ngoc Lan and Đằng Giao set out to answer the questions regarding the property, and the house, at the corner of Euclid Street and Hazard Avenue...

The disappearing car and the history of the haunted house

Ngọc Lan & Đằng-Giao/Người Việt Translation: Titi Mary Tran Editor’s note: Nguoi Viet News reporters Ngoc Lan and Đằng Giao set out to answer the questions regarding the property, and the house, at the corner of Euclid Street and Hazard Avenue...

Meeting the owners of the ‘haunted house’

Ngọc Lan & Đằng-Giao/Người Việt Translation: Titi Mary Tran Editor’s note: Nguoi Viet News reporters Ngoc Lan and Đằng Giao set out to answer the questions regarding the property, and the house, at the corner of Euclid Street and Hazard Avenue...

‘Giving back’ just one reason why Vietnamese-Americans volunteer

Vietnamese-Americans ranging in age from the late teens to the 60s gathered in Santa Ana recently to discuss how they’ll spend their time and energy on their next big project.

‘Crazy Rich Asians’ an important step in English-speaking countries

If you grew up in Asia and watched a lot of movies that have Asian stars, it isn’t a big deal to see “Crazy Rich Asians” on the big screen.